Meal Times: Ancient Meals for Modern Cooks -    ⋄ Meal Times: Ancient Foods for Modern Cooks ⋄   
 

More than a hundred stalls shelter under the hideous metal roof of le Marché des Capucins (the Capuchin Market) and spill out onto the sidewalks on two sides. This open-air market in Bordeaux first opened in 1749 in le Place des Capucins (named after the Capuchin order of monks). The market continues today near Place de la Victoire in a neighborhood of restaurants and ethnic stores.

The vendors encompass all you would find at an American farmer's market—and more: Butchers, bakers, caterers, florists, cheese merchants, fruit and vegetable sellers, wine merchants, olive sellers, oyster sellers, fishmongers, tripe sellers, and poultry dealers. Also, some stalls house tiny restaurants and sellers of cheap imported goods.

—Shauna
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Painted fiberglass cow (in front of a butcher's stall) welcomes you to the market.
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One of many colorful vegetable and fruit stands. Note the corrugated tomatoes. They have few seeds, so they may be a sauce tomato.
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Sausages, cuts of pork, and patés. The foods of Bordeaux and the rest of Aquitaine are rich and heavy.
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Cheeses. Almost all the cheeses at the market are locally made, and the signs tell you where, as well as what kind of cheese they are, what animal (cow, goat, or sheep) the milk came from, whether the milk was organic, and whether the milk had been pasteurized or not.
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Purses, purses, and purses. And not the prices I expected: All of the purses visible here were at least 35 euros. They were cheap only in quality.
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Italian foods, included several kinds of stuffed pasta.
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More kinds of cheeses.
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Fresh hake of various sizes. (Hake is a relative of cod.)
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Olives and olive salads.
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Small lobsters. Note that they are cheaper per kilogram than some of the cheeses shown earlier.
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Animal legs? I did not approach closely enough to read the tags.
6/22/2013 08:07:38 pm

Hey! I live there. Did my shopping there this morning. It's usually a good market but the produce is not too inspiring at the moment as we've had a lousy spring. The bags and stuff are awful, sold mainly by and to the vast immigrant population from Africa and eastern Europe.

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6/23/2013 08:47:31 pm

Jane, I've been in Bordeaux for almost four weeks (my husband had a visiting scholar appointment at the university) and am about to leave to go back to southern California. We've been exploring a lot!

My husband's French colleague took us out sightseeing in the countryside yesterday. We encountered a 92-year-old who said that this spring was the coldest and rainiest he can remember. I feel sorry for the farmers, but at least the bad weather during our stay was recordbreaking bad weather.

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Jane Dougherty
7/4/2013 07:31:02 am

You were certainly unlucky with the weather! It means everything is very lush and green this year, but the flowers, particularly the roses took a tremendous battering. The vignerons haven't suffered too much here, but further north, in parts of the Loire the harvest will be very poor.

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Constantine Issighos
2/23/2014 04:15:31 pm

As a writer of the Gustave Eiffel Exploration Series I'm looking forward to visit the Market Capuchin in Bordeaux this summer. The market is another of Eiffel's creations which would ad to my next volumes. Also I would like to try some of the good food showing in your pictures..

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6/16/2014 02:16:24 pm

I could cry the food looks so good! You just don't get this quality and variety in the UK

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